Librenix
Headlines | Linux | Apps | Coding | BSD | Admin | News
Information for Linux System Administration 

Install FB4Linux in Eclipse

Up
vote
Down

Flash development in Linux is often left to a generic text editor used with the free Flex SDK. It is certainly possible to code this way, but you do lose out on a lot of the functionality of a more specific IDE. The FB4Linux project provides a plugin for Eclipse that provides a similar environment to FlashBuilder 4. The only downside is that the installation instructions gloss over a few of the details required to get the plugin installed in Eclipse 3.5.2, which is the version of Eclipse that is available in the Ubuntu software repositories at the time of writing. This article shows you how to get FB4Linux up and running from start to finish. read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:9346 | -mcasperson, July 27, 2010

Display Google Gadgets in Gnome 3 with Screenlets

Up
vote
Down

One of the cool features of Screenlets is the ability to display widgets from a wide range of tools, including Google Gadgets. With its simple conversion feature, Screenlets allows you to easily place Google Gadgets on your Gnome 3 desktop. The following instructions show you how this can be done. read more...
permapage | score:9185 | -mcasperson, July 11, 2011

Changing resolutions in Android x86

Up
vote
Down

Chances are, if you are installing Android onto a desktop system, you will want to make use of the higher resolutions that are available, since your desktop probably has a bigger monitor than the average mobile phone or tablet. Android is quite flexible in the resolutions it offers, and most Android apps can take advantage of higher resolutions.

(here are some high resolution prints) read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:9072 | -mcasperson, August 29, 2011 (Updated: April 24, 2012)

Boot C64 games in Linux

Up
vote
Down

It's lunch time, and you have 5 minutes to chill out and forget about those reports due by the end of the week. You could play some solitaire, but why limit yourself to the same old dull card games? Some of my favorite games were made for the Commodare 64, and to this day still provide a quick and enjoyable distraction for those otherwise dull desk based lunch breaks.

The good news is that don't have to remember a bunch of archaic commands to get your favorite C64 games up and running. Using the VICE emulator, it takes nothing more than creating a desktop icon to boot a C64 game. read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:9047 | -mcasperson, August 15, 2011

Install the Theme Selector Gnome Shell Extension

Up
vote
Down

Gnome 3 includes support for themes, but does not include a convenient way to select them. The Gnome Shell Theme Selector Extension by Finnbarr P. Murphy provides a simple way to change themes from the Activities screen. read more...
permapage | score:8775 | -mcasperson, June 17, 2011

Create native looking Firefox web apps

Up
vote
Down

HTML5 and Flash have been used to great effect in recreating traditional desktop apps that can be run through your web browser. Google is so confident that web apps can replace your desktop apps that it has released the ChromeOS, which is not much more than the Chrome web browser presented as a desktop operating system.

Firefox has long supported running web apps in a kind of desktop mode through projects like Prism, WebRunner and Chromeless. But a lot of these projects are either dead, in their early stages, or require a lot of mucking around to get running.

The good news is that it is quite easy to launch your favourite web apps in a chromeless Firefox 4/5 window with just a few simple steps. read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:8758 | -mcasperson, August 5, 2011

Quick Install: Screenlets in Fedora 15

Up
vote
Down

Screenlets provides a huge variety of desktop widgets, including support for Superkaramba themes and Google Gedgets (through a converter). The project supplies a convenient package for Ubuntu users, but it appears that there is no RPM for Fedora users. But, with a few simple commands, it is possible to get screenlets up and running in Fedora 15. read more...
permapage | score:8758 | -mcasperson, July 8, 2011

Integrating Pidgin and Gnome 3

Up
vote
Down

As a Linux user I know that I should revel in sparse user interfaces and command line driven applications, but for my day to day communications, I prefer Pidgin over XChat. It's just more pleasant to look at, and goes beyond just IRC chat. The problem with Pidgin and Gnome 3 is that it is hard to tell when someone is trying to get your attention. The little smiley face that gets displayed on the system tray icon is lost in Gnome 3, as the icons are now hidden in a disappearing bar at the bottom of the screen. read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:8730 | -mcasperson, August 12, 2011

Using an ISA Proxy server in Linux

Up
vote
Down

NTLM (NT LAN Manager) is a Microsoft authentication protocol. It is used extensively in older versions of Windows, and Microsoft has embedded the NTLM authentication into several communication protocols, such as HTTP, POP3 and SMTP. One benefit of NTLM authentication is that Windows users can get transparent access through an ISA proxy server. While the proxy does require a username and password, IE will happily send the users current credentials without any additional prompt.

Linux users don't tend to be so lucky. Most web browsers will support NTLM authentication when using an ISA proxy, but there are some cases, like when using the proxy settings in OpenSuse 11.2, where the lack of support for NTLM can effectively prevent internet access.

Fortunately there is a fairly simple way around this limitation. A small Python utility called NTLM Authorization Proxy Server can be used to ferry internet traffic between the OS and a ISA proxy server. read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:8667 | -mcasperson, July 7, 2010

Use Webshots as Gnome 3 backgrounds

Up
vote
Down

The ability to use Flickr images as a background was a much advertised Gnome 3 feature that unfortunately just doesn't work in most distributions. But with a few simple hacks, it is possible to have your Gnome 3 desktop displaying Flickr images. read more...
permapage | score:8663 | -mcasperson, June 6, 2011

Run Android apps on Linux: Boot the emulator quickly

Up
vote
Down

One of the great things about Android is the fact that anyone is free to develop applications for the platform. Google provide Android SDKs for Windows, Linux and MacOS, and part of the SDK is an emulator that lets you run the latest Android operating system from your PC desktop. The aim here is obvisouly to allow developers to test their applications without having to swap to an actual Android device, but it can also be used to run your favourite Android based applications alongside your traditional desktop apps. read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:8657 | -mcasperson, June 28, 2011

Three Quake like drop-down terminals for Linux

Up
vote
Down

I have become a big fan of drop down terminal windows, modeled after the Quake console, instead of having a terminal window sitting in the background that I have to switch to for every command that I want to run. You just press a keyboard shortcut, run your command, and hide the window again. There is no mucking around with virtual desktops, and you don't have to try and find a terminal window buried beneath all you other applications. read more...
permapage | score:8610 | -mcasperson, August 16, 2011

Installing Android x86 in VirtualBox

Up
vote
Down

In a previous post I showed you how to install and configure the Android SDK emulator to boot up quickly. What you may have found out by now is that the emulator is incredibly slow. In fact it is only any good if you have the kind of PC that can render the entire Transformers movie in a few minutes.

If you are just interested in running Android applications on your desktop PC, a project called Android x86 provides a copy of the Android operating system compiled for x86 processors. The latest release is Android 2.2, which is a little bit behind Honeycomb (Android 3), but is still capable of running almost all Android applications. read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:8576 | -mcasperson, July 4, 2011

JPC2: A point and click Windows XP virtual machine

Up
vote
Down

I've said it before, and I'll say it again. Linux has come a long way, but there are inevitably one or two Windows only programs that you just can't replace with open source equivalents. For me it was the CHM compiler, and FlashDevelop. Sometimes it's not even a case of being able to find an open source replacement if you are trying to document or grab screen shots of a Windows application.

Wine may offer some relief, but virtualization is the most reliable solution. However, both have traditionally involved a lot of configuration. But now there is a solution that goes by the name JPC-2. It is a pure Java virtual machine that can run unmodified versions of Windows XP and older copies of Ubuntu. read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:8563 | -mcasperson, August 25, 2011

A system monitor applet for Gnome 3

Up
vote
Down

One of the controversial decisions made by the Gnome 3 developers was to do away with applets. For the most part I agree that applets were not very useful, but one applet I did use was the system monitor. To be able to see at a glance if the cpu or memory was being overloaded was a great convenience, and one that is sorely missed in Gnome 3.

The good news is that this new system monitor extension from paradoxxxzero brings back most of the functionality of the old Gnome 2 system monitor applet. read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:8562 | -mcasperson, June 10, 2011

Rotating Gnome 3 background images

Up
vote
Down

There are a lot of desktop background switchers available, but Gnome 3 has changed it's interface just enough to stop most of them from working. But a little project from Dhananjay Sathe provides a fairly easy way to setup a Gnome 3 desktop background slideshow. read more...
permapage | score:8547 | -mcasperson, August 8, 2011

Placing system icons on the top bar in Gnome 3

Up
vote
Down

"System Tray" icons were a great idea in Windows 95, but over the years the concept has been abused. It's not uncommon to get a new Windows PC with a dozen system tray icons, usually serving no purpose other than to advertise the existance of the application to which the icon belongs.

Linux machines are not quite as bad, but this hasn't stopped the designers of Gnome 3 from hiding these icons in a hidden bottom bar that appears only when you move the mouse to the bottom of the screen.

If you still prefer to have these icons on the screen (and lets face it, the Gnome 3 top bar is mostly empty space anyway), you can use the icon manager extension to selectively move icons from the bottom bar to the top bar. read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:8494 | -mcasperson, July 7, 2011

Gnome 3 Music Player Extension

Up
vote
Down

Even though I never really warmed to Unity, I did like the way Ubuntu integrated controls for music players right into the interface. And now, thanks to a Gnome Extension from ycDref, you can have this functionality inside Gnome 3 too. read more...
permapage | score:8492 | -mcasperson, June 16, 2011

Install Linux Flash Player 11 64bit for Chrome and Chromium

Up
vote
Down

Adobe has just released a beta of Flash Player 11, which includes native 64 bit clients. This is big news for Linux users, who are easily some of the most enthuastic adopters of 64 bit operating systems, and who may have been feeling a little left out after Adobe dumped AIR for Linux. read more...
permapage | score:8484 | -mcasperson, July 15, 2011

Compile Crystal Space in Ubuntu 10.04

Up
vote
Down

If you are a budding game developer, there is a wide selection of 3D engines that you can use to get your ideas off the ground. The first step when using a 3D engine (or any library distributed as source code) is to compile it. Crystal Space is no different. The steps below will show you how to get Crystal Space up and running on your Ubuntu PC. read more...
permapage | score:8440 | -mcasperson, July 2, 2010
More articles...
Abstract Art in North Florida

Selected articles

Linux vs. Windows: Why Linux will win

Apple to Intel move no threat to Linux

Hacker Haiku

The life cycle of a programmer

Space Tyrant: A multiplayer network game for Linux

Space Tyrant: Multithreading lessons learned on SMP hardware

Programming Language Tradeoffs: 3GL vs 4GL

The short life and hard times of a Linux virus

Download: Linux 3D Client for Starship Traders

Missing the point of the Mac Mini

Scripting: A parallel Linux backup script

Mono-culture and the .NETwork effect

The Supreme Court is wrong on Copyright Case

Shadow.sh: A simple directory shadowing script for Linux

Microsoft to push unlicensed users to Linux

Librenix T-Shirts and Coffee Mugs!

Why Programmers are not Software Engineers

Beneficial Computer Viruses

Tutorial: Introduction to Linux files

No, RMS, Linux is not GNU/Linux

VPS: Xen vs. OpenVZ

The Network Computer: An opportunity for Linux

Linux dominates Windows

Closed Source Linux Distribution Launched

Why software sucks

Testing the Digital Ocean $5 Cloud Servers with an MMORPG

Space Tyrant: A threaded C game project: First Code

The Real Microsoft Monopoly

How to install Ubuntu Linux on the decTOP SFF computer

Apple DIY Repair

Space Tyrant: A threaded game server project in C

MiniLesson: An introduction to Linux in ten commands

Graffiti Server Download Page

 

Firefox sidebar

Site map

Site info

News feed

Features

Login
(to post)

Search

 
Articles are owned by their authors.   © 2000-2012 Ray Yeargin