Librenix
Headlines | Linux | Apps | Coding | BSD | Admin | News
Information for Linux System Administration 

Linux dominates Windows

Up
vote
Down

Linux dominates Windows -- and everything else -- on supercomputers in 2010. Microsoft's renowned engineering quality and down-to-earth pricing shows brilliantly in its capturing 1% of the top 500 supercomputer projects. Perhaps next year, utilizing all the organizational pressure they can bring to bear, they can retain 0.8%.

Formal Unix, now long dead*, controls 4.4%. Meanwhile, Linux is now installed on 91% of the remaining 95% of top systems. Add in the single BSD system and you have Unix-like systems (Unix+Linux+BSD) accounting for 95.6% of the top supercomputer projects. The remaining 3.4% of are 'mixed' systems and may also contain significant percentages of Unix and Linux.

There are many reasons for Linux' success. Among the top factors are surely these four, in no particular order:
  • Price (starting at free)
  • Quality (excellent code, Unix-based design)
  • Hardware Support (most all modern quality gear is supported)
  • Open Source (open to tinkering -- and redistributable)
Check my math on the top 500 systems here.

*Of course, counting functional Unix systems while ignoring the trademarked term, Unix is clearly not dead since Linux is one of the truest of the true Unix work-alike systems. Linux is, of course, the reason formal Unix has suffered such a precipitous decline. Many Unix users just switched flavors -- and Linux was a most appealing flavor.
mail this link | score:9423 | -Ray, June 2, 2010
More articles...

Gallery Wrapped Abstract Art

news headlines

ARM-based EMB-2500: Like Raspberry Pi, but much better

Note to EFF: FDE implementation in Ubuntu Ubiquity is only at 50%

Why Ubuntu Lags the iPad

Cotton Candy: Pocket Android or Ubuntu

Linux Mint 12 screenshot preview

OwnCloud and PageKite: trouble with Verizon?

Two reasons to use KDE

 

Firefox sidebar

Site map

Site info

News feed

Features

Login
(to post)

Search

 
Articles are owned by their authors.   © 2000-2012 Ray Yeargin