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Tutorial: Publish files with BitTorrent

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This article, 'Distributing Content with BitTorrent', shows how to publish content using BitTorrent. This is probably the ideal way to distribute large files (or very popular small files) from your limited bandwidth website.

The article starts out with an overview of BitTorrent and leads you through what you need to know to set up your own torrent.
BitTorrent has three distinct components: the client, the web server, and the tracker. The client is the person/machine that downloads the content. The web server provides a link to a file called a torrent. The torrent is a specially created file that describes the shared file and the location of the tracker. This third component is a service that waits for a connection from a client. It sits on a user-assigned socket that can be either on the same machine as the web server or at another location. The tracker not only supervises the sharing of the content between multiple clients, but also logs all downloading activities. The tracker can manage many files at the same time from many different torrents on many different web servers. You can even refer to the tracker by a torrent that you have downloaded as a file on your machine, eliminating the need for the web server.
 read more | mail this link | score:7280 | -Ray, September 7, 2005
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Articles are owned by their authors.   © 2000-2012 Ray Yeargin