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Book Review: The Book Of Gimp

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I usually use GIMP (the "GNU Image Manipulation Program") for editing photos, changing colors, resizing photos, applying significant effects and more. It is a free software alternative to Adobe Photoshop. It is also quite popular with graphics artists and webmasters who wants to edit digital images. GIMP is not just a Linux specific program. It works on all leading operating systems, i.e., Mac OS X, MS-Windows and Unix variants. However, like many other powerful open source software, GIMP can be difficult to master. There are many options and plugins. So if, you are looking to learn or master the GIMP program, give The Book of GIMP a try. read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:9339 | -nixcraft, March 8, 2013

Book Review: FreeBSD Device Drivers by Joseph Kong

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The Introduction says the goal of the book is “to help you improve your understanding of device drivers under FreeBSD”. OK, that is exactly what I wanted to do as I am currently working on several projects that use FreeBSD at deeper levels of understanding. read more...
permapage | score:8845 | -aweber, May 1, 2012

Book Review: Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python, 2nd Ed.

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Got a potential young programmer in your family?
The best recommendation I can give for this book is simply this: just a few days after I gave a copy to my 13-year-old son for his birthday, and without any more intervention from me, he showed me his first completed game program. It was a simple numbers guessing game — the first major exercise from this book. Since then, he’s been following along and tinkering with Python. The book has kept him motivated and built up his confidence in his own skills, which is a tricky thing to achieve (something I’ve tried myself with mixed success).
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mail this link | permapage | score:8489 | -Ray, March 8, 2011

Book Review: A Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux

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This book covers 8.04 and 8.10 of Ubuntu...
I upgraded my Ubuntu VM to 8.10 just for this review (well, not "just" for this review, but mostly). Of course, Sobell's second edition of this "I-weigh-a-ton" tome covers both 8.04 and 8.10, but I run 8.04 on my production machine, so I figure I've got the book covered. Judging by the size of the book though, I'd have to assume that Sobell has it covered as well. But does he? Unlike Godzilla, size doesn't always matter. Let's have a look.
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mail this link | permapage | score:8308 | -Ray, February 3, 2009

Book Review: Unix Shells by Example

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With 1150 pages, at least you'll feel like you got your $50 worth...
This book is most helpful for the motivated novice or intermediate programmer seeking to improve, and I heartily recommend it. For experienced programmers, however, it's less clear whether this book provides sufficient benefit. The marketing folks at Prentice Hall state that "instead of buying four or five books to work with different shells, all you need is one".
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permapage | score:8293 | -Ray, December 2, 2004

Book review: Head First Java

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Reviewer plunges head first into 'silly' Java book, finds himself thoroughly learning Java. I guess that's about as good a thing as you can say about a programming book.
Of course, you can't learn Java without a good understanding of object-oriented languages. I made fairly heavy going with 'Learning Java' until I decided to dive in head first. Head First Java, that is -- a new book from O'Reilly that has a totally different attitude to teaching than I've seen before in computer books. It also looks like this might be the start of a series from O'Reilly, the website an introduction seem to assume that there will be more 'Head First' titles and I hope so. The style is humorous, full of graphics, cartoons, puzzles, quizzes and crosswords.
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mail this link | permapage | score:8293 | -Ray, July 17, 2003

Book Review: Ubuntu Made Easy

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The task this book sets out to do is impossible and many who purchase the book will expect a great deal more. Everyone wants a one volume answer guide to the Ubuntu Desktop, it simply is not possible. The goal of the current book, is to provide “jumping-off point to get started.” read more...
permapage | score:8274 | -aweber, September 11, 2012

Book review: Jess in Action

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Curious about Jess?
Jess in Action starts with an introduction to rule-based systems, goes through the basics of the Jess language, and then dives into the examples; the appendices include API references to both Jess functions and Jess's Java APIs, and numerous links and references are scattered throughout the book.
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permapage | score:8264 | -Ray, November 5, 2003

Ubuntu 10.10 Netbook review

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Ubuntu 10.10 Netbook Edition is the version of Ubuntu optimized for netbooks and other small screen computers. This article offers a detailed review, with emphasis on Unity, the new desktop interface that ships with it. read more...
permapage | score:8180 | -finid, November 1, 2010

Book Review: Lean Software Development

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Lean Software Development: An Agile Toolkit lists for about $45.
The book's very useful for anyone involved in or around the software development process: developers, leads, managers, and corner-office types. Corner-office types won't get as much out of the book as those in the trenches, but the Poppendiecks' arguments against overly-constraining process management systems may help high-level managers come to understand that such systems can actually hurt production.
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mail this link | permapage | score:8168 | -Ray, September 2, 2005

Book Review: Running Xen

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Running Xen lists for about $50...
Running Xen started with a thorough-enough explanation of virtualization. Several different approaches to virtualization were compared and contrasted, which should help the reader to understand where Xen resides in the whole domain. This first chapter was a great introduction as it provided just the right amount of information. At no point did I consider the explanations to be short or lacking; nor did I feel overloaded with details. The authors seemed adequately aware that the title of the book was Running Xen, and they stuck to that scope.
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mail this link | permapage | score:7928 | -Ray, June 11, 2008

Book Review: Cascading Style Sheets

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A copy of Cascading Style Sheets - The Definitive Guide lists for about $40.
As you would expect from something that bills itself as a 'definitive guide' the coverage is very thorough. All major areas of CSS are covered, including a chapter that looks at non-screen media. In most cases the text is clear enough, even when dealing with some of the more obscure elements of CSS. At times the book could do with fuller examples that put things together, there are no extended examples that look at a set of complete pages for example.
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mail this link | permapage | score:7906 | -Ray, June 27, 2004

Book Review: Wicked Cook Java

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Wicked Cook Java lists for about $30.
The back cover calls it an "idea sourcebook" and I'm going to concur with that description. It contains a very wide range of subject matter and so each chapter addresses a portion of that spectrum. The first three chapters cover core Java skills and will be applicable to every reader of the book. The balance of the chapters are more discretionary and will appeal to different readers to differing levels. Each of the chapters brings about a dozen thoughts or tools concerning the subject area to the reader. Most of these tools are explained and short code samples are given for their use.
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mail this link | permapage | score:7904 | -Ray, January 26, 2006

Book review: CUPS - Common Unix Printing System

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Learn to install, use, and administrate CUPS.
If you do not use a printer with Unix or Linux, or if you do and you are perfectly happy with the results (maybe because the distro came with all the right stuff pre-installed), this book is not for you.

However, if you are serious about printing, if you are considering replacing the outdated legacy printing system that came with your Unix or Linux or if you are a developer even remotely interested in Linux/Unix printing, this book is for you.
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mail this link | permapage | score:7891 | -Ray, June 4, 2003

Book Review: Linux on the Mainframe

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This one might be worth the $50 if you are looking to load Linux on your handy IBM mainframe...
Two words that guarantee heated discussions at both the business level and the IT level are Linux and mainframe. So, when I saw this title, Linux on the Mainframe, I couldn't resist taking a peak inside. It's actually funny to hear people debate about these two platforms considering that the roots of both operating systems are older than the people who typically discuss it.
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mail this link | permapage | score:7852 | -Ray, May 15, 2004

Book review: JavaScript and DHTML Cookbook

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For the list price of $40 you get a highly recommended book.
The recipes in JavaScript & DHTML Cookbook are extremely practical, well thought out, and even educational. Discussions like Calculating the Number of Days Between Two Dates, Simulating a Hash Table for Fast Array Lookup, and Transforming XML Data into HTML Tables not only are very useful to the cut-and-paster, they teach even seasoned JavaScripters a thing or two about the language.
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permapage | score:7836 | -Ray, August 26, 2003

Book Review: Perl Debugger Pocket Reference

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This handy book will only cost you about $10...
One of the most useful methods of checking Perl code, though, is the Perl debugger. Despite the usefulness of this tool, most Perl programmers (including me) never use it. There are a few reasons why we don't use the Perl debugger — we don't know how to use it or feel like learning how to use it is one reason. As part of O'Reilly's monograph (aka Pocket Reference) series, they've recently released a small book on the subject called Perl Debugger Pocket Reference, written by Richard Foley. Although it's small, the book simplifies getting started with the debugger and the price makes it affordable.
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mail this link | permapage | score:7798 | -Ray, April 21, 2004

Book Review: The Definitive Guide to GCC

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The Definitive Guide to GCC lists for about $50...
GCC (The Gnu Compiler Collection) is the most widely used compiler in Open Source development. This is because of the quality of code, the multiplicity of platforms, and the level of community support that is available. It is called a compiler "collection" because GCC is a suite of compilers that include front ends for FORTRAN, java, Ada, C, C++, Objective C, and others. This book mainly deals with the latest series of releases, the 3.X series, with notes on significant deviations from earlier versions.
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mail this link | permapage | score:7766 | -Ray, September 8, 2004

Book Review: A Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux

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This book comes complete with a Live DVD of Ubuntu...
Part I uses two chapters to provide an overview of, and step-by-step instructions for, installing Linux. The overview provides information about the process including how to try Linux with the Live DVD supplied, planning your hard disk layout, acquiring a newer version of Ubuntu, and the install process in general. The step-by-step chapter goes into great detail on each step of the process, using both the graphical and textual installation paths. It also throws in additional detail on how to configure the X server.

Now that you have Linux in a runnable form, Part II provides higher-level information that shows newer Linux users what they can do.
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mail this link | permapage | score:7763 | -Ray, April 4, 2008

Book Review: Tao of Security Monitoring

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Tao of Security Monitoring lists for about $50.
Another gem is the idea of a "defensible network": not "secure" or "protected," but defensible. A defensible network is one that can be watched, is configured to limit possible intruder actions, can be kept up to date, and runs only the minimum necessary services. A network so configured assures that if bad things happen there, they can be handled effectively.
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permapage | score:7735 | -Ray, August 28, 2004
More articles...
Buy Abstract Art Prints

Selected articles

Space Tyrant: Multithreading lessons learned on SMP hardware

Why software sucks

Apple to Intel move no threat to Linux

MiniLesson: An introduction to Linux in ten commands

Linux dominates Windows

Hacker Haiku

Space Tyrant: A threaded game server project in C

Programming Language Tradeoffs: 3GL vs 4GL

Scripting: A parallel Linux backup script

Beneficial Computer Viruses

Space Tyrant: A multiplayer network game for Linux

Apple DIY Repair

The Supreme Court is wrong on Copyright Case

Linux vs. Windows: Why Linux will win

Graffiti Server Download Page

Microsoft to push unlicensed users to Linux

Mono-culture and the .NETwork effect

How to install Ubuntu Linux on the decTOP SFF computer

Download: Linux 3D Client for Starship Traders

Closed Source Linux Distribution Launched

VPS: Xen vs. OpenVZ

The Real Microsoft Monopoly

Tutorial: Introduction to Linux files

The Network Computer: An opportunity for Linux

Shadow.sh: A simple directory shadowing script for Linux

Testing the Digital Ocean $5 Cloud Servers with an MMORPG

Why Programmers are not Software Engineers

No, RMS, Linux is not GNU/Linux

The life cycle of a programmer

Missing the point of the Mac Mini

Librenix T-Shirts and Coffee Mugs!

Space Tyrant: A threaded C game project: First Code

The short life and hard times of a Linux virus

 

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Articles are owned by their authors.   © 2000-2012 Ray Yeargin