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Linux mail command examples: send mails from command line

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This tutorial shows how to send and receive mails from the command line using the mail and mutt commands on linux. read more...
permapage | score:9966 | -Silver Moon, August 28, 2013

Command line functions

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Functions may be defined at the command-line and then used as many times as needed as long as a new shell is not started. This feature of the Bash shell can be a handy tool if you are repeatedly performing the same command or series of commands. read more...
permapage | score:8444 | -aweber, July 8, 2011

Command line tips: Linux Cal (Calendar)

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How to make a calendar under Linux with the cal command.
Ok, noobies, listen up! It's time to get out of that GUI hammock you've been resting in and get down to business on the command line. One of the things computers do best is remember stuff. Dates. Appointments. Holidays. Birthdays. All sorts of stuff. There is a wealth of date-related information available to you at the CLI. This week we'll take a look at two handy date-related tools available in the CLI: cal and calendar.
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mail this link | permapage | score:8398 | -Ray, March 23, 2004 (Updated: October 22, 2004)

Nail: Linux command line mail

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I still type 'mailx' out of habit, but it's just a link to nail on my system.
Nail is a lightweight console-based mail client, made to be a modern replacement for the ancient mailx command. It's fully compatible with mailx, but has a lot more features, which makes it appropriate for everyday use. Nail supports POP3, IMAP, and SMTP out of the box, so there's no need for further programs like Fetchmail or Postfix. It also has a built-in Bayesian spam filter, so you don't need external tools like SpamAssassin.
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mail this link | permapage | score:8293 | -Ray, February 17, 2006

cutmp3: Command Line MP3 Editor

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cutmp3, as the name implies is a simple command line tool to edit and cut MP3 files without loosing any quality. cutmp3 can edit the mp3 files interactively or selection (start time and end time) can be provided from the command line or even better can be used with a timetable fiile specifiying different start/end times from the same MP3 files. read more...
permapage | score:8288 | -Susenator, May 16, 2009

qrencode: Generate QR code from Ubuntu command line

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A QR Code (it stands for “Quick Response”) is a mobile phone readable barcode. simply encode a URL into the QR Code and then point a mobile phone (or other camera-enabled mobile) at it. If the device has had QR Code decoding software installed on it, it will fire up its browser and go straight to... read more...
permapage | score:8270 | -Linux Tips, October 26, 2011

Command line web browser: Lynx

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I use Lynx every day. No, really...
This time I've gone too far. Espousing the use of a text-based web browser is like encouraging honesty at Microsoft. The very notion of a text interface for the Web runs against the grain. Nonetheless, that's what we're doing this week here on the CLI frontier. Come read about a lean, mean, text-based browsing machine that's faster than a lynx. Actually, it is a Lynx.
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permapage | score:8201 | -Ray, February 1, 2005 (Updated: August 24, 2008)

Linux command line tutorial

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GUIs are fine, but to unlock the real power of Linux, there's no substitute for the command line. Get to know some of the major features of the bash shell. By the end of this article, you will be comfortable using basic Linux commands like echo and exit, setting environment variables, and gathering system information.

(here are some fine art canvas prints) read more...
permapage | score:8189 | -solrac, August 28, 2009 (Updated: April 24, 2012)

The five Ws of the Linux Command Line

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After the five W's of the the Linux command line, a little bitty cheat give you the 'H' of how...
Finally, as was the case back in school, the "sixth W," how, comes last. There is no how or howis command. But if your system isn't complete without that final question, there is a simple solution. Enter the following command to give your Linux box a useful and convenient how: ln -s /usr/bin/man /usr/bin/how. And just like that, you have all of your Ws (and your H) covered.
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mail this link | permapage | score:8154 | -Ray, July 25, 2006

MOC: Command line audio player

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Play your music from a text interface...
Based on ncurses, MOC (music on console) is a popular, text-based audio player which can play various audio formats, including Ogg Vorbis, FLAC, MP3, MP4, WMA and WAV. The release I'm going to talk about in this article is 2.5.0-alpha3, as it comes with Debian Lenny.
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permapage | score:8153 | -Ray, April 27, 2009

xclip: Copy from command line to X clipboard in openSUSE

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xclip is a command line interface to the X11 selections (X11 clipboard). It can also be used for copying files, as an alternative to sftp/scp, thus avoiding password prompts when X11 forwarding has already been setup. xclip reads from Standard Input or from one or more files and copy it to the X11 clipboard making it available to the X applications. xclip can also print the content of the current X clipboard onto the standard output or to a file. read more...
permapage | score:8141 | -Susenator, April 15, 2009

CLI vs. GUI: The case for the command line shell

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There are good reasons why a GUI can never replace bash and friends.
I do not think that typed-in commands must necessarily be consigned to the dustbin of computer history. Of course, I am not suggesting that we all drop X and Windows and pretend like we are living in the early eighties. The command line interface still has much to offer us, and many of its benefits simply cannot physically be emulated or even replaced by graphical ones.

In this article, I will be analyzing the specific properties that make the command line unique and irreplaceable. I will likewise analyze the graphical UI's features--though only giving it a cursory look, since I assume my audience does not need to be persuaded to make the most of its video hardware.
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mail this link | permapage | score:8130 | -Ray, September 4, 2003

Review: Command Line Browsers

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Believe it or not some people still use plain text browsers. These can count for as much as half a percent of hits on a site, depending on the nature of the site. The main plain text browsers in use today seem to be lynx, links and w3m.

This article is a review which compares these three browsers.
I have never taken to the GUI interface with enthusiasm. Pointing devices are essential for manipulating graphical objects. A keyboard, however, remains the best interface for viewing and/or manipulating text. Many websites present information that have a large graphical component. Most of the time, however, the interesting material is contained in HTML text. In cases like this the graphics can be a distraction and a waste of bandwidth. Often the images contain only logos, advertising, or dressing. When I first check a website, I usually go there with lynx. This is a text only browser, which works very well from the system console, and even though it doesn't cope well with Java, frames or graphics, it has a number of good points, namely...
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mail this link | permapage | score:8100 | -Gerry Patterson, August 7, 2002 (Updated: July 19, 2003)

wget tutorial: Command line downloads

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Automate your http downloads with wget...
Despite the fusion of some browsers with file managers many still do not support the multi-selection and rubber banding operations that make it easy to transfer several files all in one go. You also have to stay logged in until the entire file has arrived. Finally, you have to be present at the office to click the link initiating the download, thus angering coworkers with whom office bandwidth is being shared.

Downloading of large files is a task more suitable for a different suite of tools. This article will discuss how to combine various GNU/Linux utilities, namely lynx, wget, at, crontab, etc. to solve a variety of file transfer situations.
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mail this link | permapage | score:8048 | -Ray, December 3, 2005 (Updated: March 23, 2007)

Command line audio players for Linux

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This article covers mp3blaster, Cplay, Cmus, and MOC...
Given the proper codecs, in Linux you can play almost any digital audio format. Linux has many graphical applications that can do the job, such as Amarok, Rhythmbox, Audacious, and XMMS, all of which provide an intuitive user interface, playlist sorting, and various other options. But what if you want low resource usage so you can play tunes on aging hardware? Here are some alternative players for the Linux command line.
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mail this link | permapage | score:8048 | -Ray, January 29, 2008

Linux Command Line Games by ESR

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Eric S. Raymond isn't just an open source evangelist -- he's a coder too.
We're going to look at a few programs he maintains -- if we can borrow a phrase from another famous coder -- just for fun.

The download page for each of these games is linked to from the game title in the section heading. A man page is included with each source code tarball. You should probably consider reading the man page a prerequisite for game play.
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permapage | score:8034 | -Ray, June 8, 2004

MPD and NCMPC: Command LIne Music

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Music nirvana from the command line...
There is literally no dearth for music player applications in Ubuntu. Banshee, which is the new default music player for Ubuntu 11.04, is among the best you can get. Alternatives include Clementine, Rhythmbox, Amarok, DeadBeef among others. But MPD(Music Player Daemon) and NCMPC(an MPD client) combination opens up a whole new genre of music players for Ubuntu power users. Folks who like tools like Twidge Twitter Client are gonna adore this.
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mail this link | permapage | score:7991 | -Ray, May 23, 2011

bash command line completion

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This pair of short articles are an introduction to the bash shell's command line completion capabilities. They come in a part 1 and a part 2.
One of the nicest facilities of the modern shell is the built in "completion" support. These facilities allow you to complete commands and their arguments easily. Read on for a brief introduction to adding your own command completions.
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mail this link | permapage | score:7977 | -Ray, December 25, 2005

Looping from the command line

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There is much hidden power in the Unix / Linux command line interface.
This script reads a list of files stored in InputFile, loops through each line and execute "ls -l" on each cycle.

The cool thing is you can use the same loop from the command line.

For example a few weeks ago we were having trouble with a resier filesystem that is used for data uploads by our Oracle DBAs. They needed to upload files and I needed to have a bunch of time to do a backup of the filesystem before I did the --rebuild-tree with reiserfsck.
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mail this link | permapage | score:7947 | -Ray, October 20, 2005

Easing SLES 10 command line administration

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The author of "The Definitive Guide to SUSE Linux Enterprise Server" talks about SGID and SUID uses, how to make device sharing easier and more.
Advanced permissions can be very useful, but very dangerous as well. Let's talk about SUID, first. This permission is meant to be used on executable program files only when strictly necessary. In my opinion, it is better not to use them at all. They can provide an excellent backdoor for a hacker if used not in the right way.
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permapage | score:7908 | -janewalker6847, February 13, 2007
More articles...
Buy Digital Art on Acrylic

Selected articles

Space Tyrant: Multithreading lessons learned on SMP hardware

Beneficial Computer Viruses

How to install Ubuntu Linux on the decTOP SFF computer

The life cycle of a programmer

MiniLesson: An introduction to Linux in ten commands

Graffiti Server Download Page

Apple to Intel move no threat to Linux

Linux vs. Windows: Why Linux will win

Currency Traders Telnet Game

Mono-culture and the .NETwork effect

Scripting: A parallel Linux backup script

Why software sucks

Why Programmers are not Software Engineers

Missing the point of the Mac Mini

Download: Linux 3D Client for Starship Traders

Tutorial: Introduction to Linux files

Closed Source Linux Distribution Launched

Hacker Haiku

VPS: Xen vs. OpenVZ

Librenix T-Shirts and Coffee Mugs!

Linux dominates Windows

The short life and hard times of a Linux virus

Space Tyrant: A threaded C game project: First Code

Microsoft to push unlicensed users to Linux

Shadow.sh: A simple directory shadowing script for Linux

Space Tyrant: A multiplayer network game for Linux

The Real Microsoft Monopoly

The Supreme Court is wrong on Copyright Case

Space Tyrant: A threaded game server project in C

Programming Language Tradeoffs: 3GL vs 4GL

The Network Computer: An opportunity for Linux

No, RMS, Linux is not GNU/Linux

Apple DIY Repair

 

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