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Build a Firebird 2.5.1 and FreeBSD 9 database server

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Here is the guide on < installing Firebird 2.5.1 from FreeBSD 9 Ports and creating your first test database; also we show you how to install Flamerobin GUI (administration tool) and the PHP driver for it. This was tested on fresh FreeBSD 9 on a kvm-linux virtual machine. read more...
permapage | score:9346 | -falko, February 1, 2012

Tutorial: FreeBSD iSCSI Initiator Installation and Configuration

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The FreeBSD iscsi_initiator implements the kernel side of the Internet SCSI (iSCSI) network protocol standard, the user land companion is iscontrol and permits access to remote virtual SCSI devices via cam.

FreeBSD 7.x has full support for iSCSI. Older version such as FreeBSD 6.3 requires backport for iSCSI. Following instruction are known to work under FreeBSD 7.0 only. read more...
permapage | score:9171 | -nixcraft, March 13, 2008

FreeBSD: Configure Apache PHP with mod_fastcgi Module

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mod_fastcgi is a cgi-module for Apache web server.

FastCGI is a language independent, scalable, open extension to CGI that provides high performance without the limitations of server specific APIs.

This article explains how to configure PHP5 - mod_fastcgi under FreeBSD operating system. read more...
permapage | score:9109 | -nixcraft, October 11, 2008

Installing NRPE on FreeBSD 9.0

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The NRPE daemon provides a way for Nagios to monitor the internal aspects of a FreeBSD box. This article will take you through the steps for installing NRPE on FreeBSD. read more...
permapage | score:9108 | -aweber, March 17, 2012

Book Review: FreeBSD Device Drivers by Joseph Kong

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The Introduction says the goal of the book is “to help you improve your understanding of device drivers under FreeBSD”. OK, that is exactly what I wanted to do as I am currently working on several projects that use FreeBSD at deeper levels of understanding. read more...
permapage | score:9053 | -aweber, May 1, 2012

Benchmarks: FreeBSD 8.0 vs. Solaris vs. Linux

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FreeBSD 8.0 takes on Fedora 12 and Ubuntu 9.10 as well as OpenSolaris 2010.02 b127 in a performance free-for-all..
The hardware we are using for benchmarking this time was a Lenovo ThinkPad T61 notebook with an Intel Core 2 Duo T9300 processor, 2GB of system memory, a 100GB Hitachi HTS72201 7200RPM SATA HDD, and a NVIDIA Quadro NVS 140M graphics processor powering a 1680 x 1050 LVDS panel.
read more...
permapage | score:8968 | -Ray, December 1, 2009

Tutorial: Installing Desktop FreeBSD

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If you would like to use your personal, dial-up system as a FreeBSD desktop computer, read on...
What follows is a tutorial aimed specifically at the ordinary desktop user interested in getting started with FreeBSD. Ed provides an easy to understand guide through FreeBSD's Sysinstall installer in part one of this series.
read more...
permapage | score:8845 | -Ray, December 4, 2003

Tutorial: FreeBSD Static Routing

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For one machine to be able to find another over a network, there must be a mechanism in place to describe how to get from one to the other. This is called routing. This how to describes FreeBSD default routing and static routing configuration for particular subnet / host. read more...
permapage | score:8764 | -nixcraft, February 4, 2008

Tutorial: FreeBSD Binary Security Updates and Patch management

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FreeBSD Update is a system for automatically building, distributing, fetching, and applying binary security updates for FreeBSD. This makes it possible to easily track the FreeBSD security branches without the need for fetching the source tree and recompiling. This article talks about using combinations of various tools to keep your FreeBSD system up to date. read more...
permapage | score:8656 | -nixcraft, August 7, 2007

Desktop FreeBSD: Initial Setup

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What to do with FreeBSD after the install...
There are several tasks to which we must attend before actually making use of our freshly installed FreeBSD system. Immediately upon reboot, you will find yourself in the console. While it is possible to setup and use the graphical login managers -- kdm, gdm or others -- it is important to note that this uses extra resources. One of our assumptions is that you might not have all that excess horsepower, so we'll stick with the console login for now.
[In case you missed it, the tutorial on installing FreeBSD is here. As usual, the new article on FreeBSD configuration is linked from [read more], below.] read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:8596 | -Ray, January 5, 2004

Set up a FreeBSD LAMP Server

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How to set up LAMP on FreeBSD...
Setting up a LAMP server is a common task for systems administrators, and FreeBSD is one of the most reliable and stable operating systems available. Why not combine both LAMP and FreeBSD to build a fast and reliable Web server?

In this article I assume FreeBSD is already installed. If not, make sure you download the latest stable production version of FreeBSD and run the installer. I recommend choosing the MINIMUM option at the installer screen to quickly install only the most basic and necessary things.
read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:8567 | -Ray, August 1, 2008

Steganography in FreeBSD: Steghide and OutGuess

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This article presents an introduction to steganography and the FreeBSD ports of Steghide and OutGuess.
This should get you started on using steganography utilities. The only question you may be asking yourself is "why use such a utility?" Probably the most common use is to safeguard passwords. We all know that we should use different passwords for various tasks. For example, you should use a different password to log into your computer, another to retrieve email, another for online banking, and yet another for when you create an account on a web server. It can be very handy to make a text file of each password and its usage, and to safeguard that file by hiding it in a place no one would suspect to look.
read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:8554 | -Ray, December 10, 2003

Comparison Review: FreeBSD vs. NetBSD

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A BSD user turns a critical eye to FreeBSD and NetBSD...
NetBSD with gcc 3.3.x doesn't compile as fast as FreeBSD, but NetBSD can compile itself easily for any platform NetBSD supports via build.sh. No such luck with FreeBSD; I had to boot FreeBSD to build FreeBSD. But with NetBSD, you can use the same framework to build under other OS's, even under Cygwin!
read more...
permapage | score:8527 | -Ray, February 25, 2005

Tutorial: FreeBSD Jail Upgrade

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The FreeBSD jail mechanism is an implementation of operating system-level virtualization that allows administrators to partition a FreeBSD-based computer system into several independent mini-systems called jails. FreeBSD jails offer security, ease of delegation and os level virtualization. This article explains how to upgrade FreeBSD jails using 'make world'. read more...
permapage | score:8489 | -nixcraft, November 18, 2008

Tutorial: FreeBSD 7.2 Upgrade

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FreeBSD is just plain old good UNIX with rock solid networking stack. A new version of the FreeBSD 7.2 has been released. Systems running FreeBSD 7.0-RELEASE, 7.1-RELEASE, 7.2-BETA1, 7.2-RC1, 7.2RC2 can upgrade using this tutorial. read more...
permapage | score:8393 | -nixcraft, May 4, 2009

Tutorial: FreeBSD Setup IPFW Firewall

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Ipfirewall (ipfw) is a FreeBSD IP packet filter and traffic accounting facility.IPFW is included in the basic FreeBSD install as a separate run time loadable module.

This small howto covers building and installing a custom kernel with IPFW. It also provide a small example on how to setting up the rules for a typical FreeBSD based Apache Web server. read more...
permapage | score:8370 | -nixcraft, July 4, 2007

How to build FreeBSD From Scratch

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Build your new FreeBSD system completely from source code.
FreeBSD From Scratch solves all these problems. The strategy is simple: use a running system to install a new system under an empty directory tree, while new partitions are mounted appropriately in that tree. Many config files can be copied to the appropriate place, and for those that cannot, mergemaster(8) is used to take care of them. Arbitrary post-configuration of the new system can be done from within the old system, up to the point where you can chroot to the new system. In other words, we go through three stages, where each stage consists of either running a shell script or invoke make:
read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:8354 | -Ray, February 9, 2003

Build a Firebird 2.5, FreeBSD 8.1 Database Server

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Here is the guide on installing Firebird 2.5 from FreeBSD 8.1 Ports and creating your first test database; also we show you how to install Flamerobin GUI (administration tool) and the PHP driver for it. This was tested on fresh FreeBSD 8.1 on a virtual machine. read more...
permapage | score:8268 | -falko, January 10, 2011

FreeBSD 8.0: First Look

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A look at the newest FreeBSD distribution...
The ZFS file system is included in FreeBSD 8.0 and from previous experience I've found it to work very well. However, my little server didn't really have the resources to properly experiment with it. For systems with enough RAM and disk to justify its use, I highly recommend taking a look at FreeBSD's ZFS implementation - for the snapshots feature, if nothing else. Being able to restore files without reaching for separate backup media can be a wonderful time saver.
read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:8228 | -Ray, December 8, 2009

The fastest OS: FreeBSD vs. Linux vs. Windows

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A little disk I/O tuning and benchmarking.
For applications that are disk intensive, we recommend that systems administrators configure their FreeBSD system to use the async option (or use soft updates for more reliability). Our hard disk benchmark was 3.8 times faster with the asynchronous FreeBSD file system, and its performance was in line with Windows 2000 and Linux (slightly faster at times, and slightly slower at other times, depending on the file size). In our real-world MailEngine test, we found that a tuned version of FreeBSD was as fast as an untuned version of Linux, for connection levels of 1500 sends or fewer, with FreeBSD performance declining steadily at simultaneous connection levels above 1500.
read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:8197 | -Ray, July 14, 2001 (Updated: June 14, 2003)
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Articles are owned by their authors.   © 2000-2012 Ray Yeargin