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Pear OS Linux Panther 3 screenshot preview

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Pear OS is a new Linux desktop distribution based on Ubuntu. Development started in early August 2011, and Pear OS 1.0, the first version marked “stable,” was released on August 15 2011. The newest release is Pear OS Linux Panther 3.

I tend not to pay too much attention to Ubuntu-based distributions especially when there is no feature or features that truly distinguishes them from their parent distribution, but Pear OS appears to be different. In fact, it looks to be better than any other Ubuntu-based distribution. Perhaps even better than Ubuntu itself. read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:9028 | -finid, December 16, 2011

Dual-boot Pear OS Panther 3 and Windows 7

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Pear OS is a desktop Linux distribution based on Ubuntu, Desktop, but with a desktop appearance fashioned after the Mac OS X UI. A review of the latest edition, Pear OS Linux Panther 3, has already been published on this website.

This article presents a step-by-step guide on how to dual-boot Pear OS and Windows 7. To start, you need to download Pear OS Panther 3 from here and burn it to a CD or transfer it to a USB stick. The computer used for this article has a 500 GB hard drive with an existing installation of Windows 7, and it is assumed that you will also be attempting this on a computer that also has an existing installation of Windows 7. read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:8490 | -finid, December 31, 2011

Pear OS Linux Panther 3 review

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Pear OS is a new Linux desktop distribution based on Ubuntu Desktop with the graphical installer. Its development started in early August 2011 by David Tavares (from France), and on August 15 2011, Pear OS 1.0, the first version marked “stable,” was released. The latest edition, release on December 14 2011, is Pear OS Linux Panther 3.

Though a Linux distribution running the GNOME 3 desktop, Pear OS’s desktop is fashioned after Apple’s Mac OS X, and each major version’s code name is taken from the Mac OS release with a corresponding version number. So, “Panther,” the code name of Pear OS Linux 3, is taken from the code name of Mac OS 10.3. read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:7676 | -finid, December 19, 2011

Book Review: Running Mac OS X Panther

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Running Mac OS X Panther lists for about $40.
This book is for users who have administered a machine or network before and want to get the absolute most out of their Mac. It's also useful for connecting your Mac to a network seamlessly. But it's complicated and technical enough if you're the kind of Mac user who doesn't have the Terminal on your dock you might be intimidated.
read more...
permapage | score:6568 | -Ray, November 27, 2004

Customize Pear OS Linux Panther 3

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Pear OS Linux Panther 3 is the latest edition of the desktop Linux distribution based on Ubuntu, but with a desktop appearance that is fashioned after the Mac OS X UI. It is the only distribution released this year that actually makes GNOME 3 look really good. It is not perfect, but it is a lot better than other distributions that use the GNOME 3 desktop environment.

As good as I think it is, there are aspects of it that could have been better configured out of the box. This short tutorial provides some tips on how to tweak those areas to make the UI a bit more user-friendly than it already is. read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:6463 | -finid, December 23, 2011

Book Review: Learning Unix for Mac OS X Panther

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Those who do not know Unix are doomed to reinvent it, poorly...
This book is for the skilled Mac user who would like to know a little more about the operating system behind the scenes. There's also information about the Mac's brand of Unix, so someone familiar with Unix but new to the Mac will also find stuff to learn. For those confident in their Mac and Unix skills, however, there's not much new in the book's 168 pages. That's not to say it's a bad book; I found it quite enjoyable to read, and it's a good title to keep in mind to recommend to a Unix novice.
read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:5563 | -Ray, November 14, 2004

Review: The good and bad of Mac OS X Panther

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Apple employee #66 speaks out on Mac OS X Panther.
OS X is up to speed at last. It appears as crisp, with a few exceptions, as OS 9.2.2. It’s obvious that the team has put in much effort in identifying and optimizing key bits of code, and that effort has paid off handsomely.
Exposé is remarkable. It offers much of the power of virtual desktops, but without the need for users to develop a complex mental model. Sweep all your current windows aside, carry out a new, contained Finder task, then sweep the windows back.
read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:5108 | -Ray, January 13, 2004

Mac OS X Panther (v. 10.3) vs. Windows XP

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Is one better than the other?
There are loads of things to consider when buying a PC or a Mac, things like API’s, software and hardware support, networking capabilities, usability and security then you have the major one, the price. You also have to consider that Mac’s are certainly aimed at the consumer market while Windows is aiming for both Consumer and Business users.

I am not stupid, I know that for the masses Windows is clearly the winner in most cases, but people have to realize that for some of us in the minority, we prefer a Mac.
read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:4731 | -Ray, November 3, 2003

Book Review: Mac OS X Server Panther

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Mac OS X Server Panther lists for about $30.
PeachPit Press labels Mac OS X Server 10.3 Panther as intended for those readers with intermediate to advanced OS X Server experience, but this is not accurate. The step-wise instruction provided by Regan and White is richly documented with screenshots, so even those new to OS X Server can follow this book. Intermediate or advanced server admins will find some nice "tips and tricks" to add to their arsenal of tools, and if they're preparing to set up their first OS X Server or XServe, they'll find this book a handy companion to "pre-lab" with and to use as a follow along guide.
read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:4331 | -Ray, February 24, 2005

Mac OS X Panther: A look at the Server Admin tool

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A discussion, with screenshots, of the features of Apple's new Panther Server Admin Tool.
In the previous version of Apple Mac OS X Server (10.2), service parameters were managed through a graphical user interface (GUI) tool called Server Settings, while log files for each of those services were read using a tool called Server Status. For the latest X Server release, Version 10.3, or Panther, the functionality of both of those tools, plus a bit more, has been combined into a single utility called Server Admin. What follows is a look at the new GUI, with screenshots and explanations of what I believe are the best new features.
read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:4301 | -Ray, November 26, 2003

Overview: Mac OS X 10.3 Panther

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What Apple calls 'the greatest operating system ever invented'.
Application switching (command-tab) no longer uses the Dock, but instead pops up a pseudo-window displaying the currently running applications (like Windows). You can navigate through the applications by repeatedly pressing Tab, or by moving the cursor over a particular application. An application is chosen when you release the command key or click the mouse.

The most obvious thing you'll notice in the Finder is the new style of browsing window. The window has the brushed metal look familiar to Safari and iTunes users.
read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:3847 | -Ray, November 5, 2003 (Updated: March 1, 2004)

OS X Panther performance on the G3 Mac

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Mac OS X Panther (version 10.3) offers surprising performance -- even on G3 processors.
Under Mac OS 9, Internet Explorer took all of 20 seconds to launch and deliver the home page Dr. Hess had configured. It took a second longer under Jaguar, but it somehow seemed longer, because the application's start screen didn't appear as quickly. Panther delivered the goods in 10 seconds flat.

Now we were getting somewhere.

Safari managed the same task in 12 seconds under Jaguar, and 8 seconds under Panther. AppleWorks was a bit of a surprise. It took 14 seconds to launch under Mac OS 9; 8 seconds to get going under Jaguar and all of 6 seconds under Panther. I expected the Classic OS to fare better.
read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:3759 | -Ray, November 17, 2003

Suggested Improvements to Mac OS X Panther

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If it ain't broke, maybe we can break it...
If you are like me, you usually have a lot of Windows open at the same time. Expose has done a lot to help us deal with the clutter of this work environment, but a feature that I wish MacOS X would borrow from the X Windows world is virtual desktops. Virtual desktops creates any number of extra desktops on your system that function just like a second monitor would. The only difference is that you are not able to see both desktops at the same time. Using some kind of pallette a user is able to switch between his various desktops. The user would also have the ability to drag between desktops, designate what desktop an application would open at, and many other options. Anyone that uses multiple monitors or desktops knows what an increase in productivity it provides.
read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:3416 | -Ray, February 17, 2004
Decorate your home or office with Fine Art

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Microsoft to push unlicensed users to Linux

Scripting: A parallel Linux backup script

The Real Microsoft Monopoly

Download: Linux 3D Client for Starship Traders

Shadow.sh: A simple directory shadowing script for Linux

The life cycle of a programmer

Beneficial Computer Viruses

Closed Source Linux Distribution Launched

Programming Language Tradeoffs: 3GL vs 4GL

Space Tyrant: A threaded game server project in C

The Network Computer: An opportunity for Linux

Mono-culture and the .NETwork effect

Space Tyrant: A multiplayer network game for Linux

No, RMS, Linux is not GNU/Linux

Hacker Haiku

Linux dominates Windows

The short life and hard times of a Linux virus

Testing the Digital Ocean $5 Cloud Servers with an MMORPG

Apple to Intel move no threat to Linux

Librenix T-Shirts and Coffee Mugs!

Tutorial: Introduction to Linux files

VPS: Xen vs. OpenVZ

Graffiti Server Download Page

Linux vs. Windows: Why Linux will win

The Supreme Court is wrong on Copyright Case

Why software sucks

Space Tyrant: A threaded C game project: First Code

Apple DIY Repair

Space Tyrant: Multithreading lessons learned on SMP hardware

Why Programmers are not Software Engineers

MiniLesson: An introduction to Linux in ten commands

How to install Ubuntu Linux on the decTOP SFF computer

Missing the point of the Mac Mini

 

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