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The Virtual Private Nightmare: VPN

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Maybe the 'P' really stands for Public...
Here's a question: What's the number 1 vector for security outbreaks today? Given the title of the article we hope you answered Virtual Private Networks (VPNs). Today's convenient world of mobile access to critical applications and information has come with a hefty burden for the world's already overburdened security teams.
(and here are some nightmare prints) read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:9085 | -Ray, August 4, 2004 (Updated: April 24, 2012)

StrongVPN on Ubuntu

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How to quickly set up StrongVPN on Ubuntu...
Although you can go the DIY way and set up your own VPN server, using a dedicated VPN service provider would save you a lot of work and time. There are a few reputable VPN service providers out there, but for my money, StrongVPN is the best of the bunch. It offers reliable service and excellent support at competitive prices. I'm not affiliated with StrongVPN in any way, but I've been using their VPN solution for almost a year, and it has been a smooth ride so far.

To make your Ubuntu machine play nicely with StrongVPN, you have to configure a VPN connection using Gnome Network Manager.
read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:8955 | -Ray, March 10, 2010

Tutorial: Linux PPTP VPN client configuration

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With this tip you will be able to work from home using VPN and that too from Linux / FreeBSD system for the proprietary Microsoft Point-to-Point vpn server.

The Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) is a method for implementing virtual private networks. It works on Data link layer (#2 layer) on TCP/IP model. PPTP Client is a Linux, FreeBSD, NetBSD and OpenBSD client for the proprietary Microsoft Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol, PPTP. Allows connection to a PPTP based Virtual Private Network (VPN) as used by employers and some cable and ADSL internet service providers. read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:8759 | -nixcraft, June 13, 2007

Add WiKID Two-Factor Authentication to OpenVPN Community On Ubuntu 13.04

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These instructions describe setting up two-factor authentication with WiKID Strong Authentication, which is a commercial/open source two-factor authentication system and OpenVPN, an SSL-encrypted VPN, on an Ubuntu 13.04 Linux server using the Radius Pluggable Authentication Module. First, we will configure PAM to use Radius, then we will configure OpenVPN to use PAM and one-time passwords, then we will create a network client on the WiKID server for OpenVPN. We won't go into specifics about installing these services, rather we will focus on configuring them to all work together. read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:8675 | -falko, June 29, 2013

Authenticate OpenVPN with LinOTP

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This howto will show you the way to set up OpenVPN to authenticate users against the LinOTP authentication backend. Thus you can bring up your VPN using two factor authentication with different kind of OTP tokens. The interesting part is, that we will also use client certificates, so that the VPN only gets established if the machine has the right client certificate and the user has the right OTP token. read more...
permapage | score:8574 | -falko, October 25, 2012

Tutorial: Set up OpenVPN Server with OpenLDAP on Ubuntu 10.04 LTS

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OpenVPN, or Open Virtual Private Network, is a tool for creating networking "tunnels" between and among groups of computers that are not on the same local network. This is useful if you have services on a local network and need to access them remotely but don't want these services to be publicly accessible. By integrating with OpenSSL, OpenVPN can encrypt all VPN traffic to provide a secure connection between machines. The OpenLDAP backend of iRedmail allows you to integrate all kinds of applications and to realize centralized account management. This tutorial shows you how to integrate OpenVPN into the iredmail ldap backend on Ubuntu 10.04; passwords will be stored in ldap and you can change passwords through webmail. read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:8481 | -falko, October 1, 2010

Build an OpenVPN home server

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I don't know about you but I can hardly resist an open WiFi hotspot. Sure I have a data plan for my smartphone and I can even use it as a wireless router for my laptop, but WiFi is way faster than 3G and there are usually no bandwidth caps or extra costs associated with it. On the other hand, a WiFi hotspot is inherently insecure. That's why I use to leave my iMac running when I'm out and about, so I will be able to surf the web through an encrypted tunnel to the SSH server at home. That technique works quite well and is pretty secure. Heck, it even helped me stay away from the Wall of Sheep during DEF CON 17!

A more robust solution than SSH tunneling is to make your laptop a member of a Virtual Private Network or VPN. Traditionally, a VPN is what a company would implement in order to provide its workers full yet secure access to the corporate network when they're away from the office – or even at a remote branch of the same company.

But you don't have to be a big boy to reap the benefits of VPN technology. Thanks to the free and Open Source OpenVPN you can actually setup your very own VPN server at home and then be able to securely access resources inside your home LAN from wherever you happen to be, no matter how you got online. Plus, with a few minor tweaks in your OpenVPN configuration you can also use the server for secure surfing, meaning you can re-route all network traffic through an encrypted channel from your laptop to the remote OpenVPN server. read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:8204 | -subZraw, July 11, 2011

Create a VPN with tsocks or VTun

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A choice of two approaches...
Virtual private networks (VPN) let remote users connect back to corporate networks over encrypted links. Many VPNs are built with proprietary technology and can be tricky and expensive to set up. For a small business or an individual who needs a simple way to securely access remote networks, setting up a true VPN might be prohibitively expensive in terms of both money and time. Let's look at two simple approaches that bring you transparency without the cost. All you need is Secure Shell (SSH) access to a server on the network you're trying to access.
read more...
mail this link | permapage | score:7907 | -Ray, June 14, 2006

Create a VPN with Remobo

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Remobo is a free software which can be used to replace the paid versions of existing difficult to use VPN setups as it can create a VPN instantly and securely. It lets you login easily and add users to your buddy list, and create a secure network for you. In private chat messaging, the file sharing client helps share information within the buddy list as well. Remobo lets you control your computer and access files securely while away from the system. read more...
permapage | score:7866 | -gg234, August 11, 2010

Tutorial: How to use SSH as a VPN

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A no fuss, no muss solution for sysadmins.
So, we started thinking about how we might set up a VPN between the application server and our internal software mirror. The only requirement is that the VPN be initiated from the "inside-out" and that the connection is only active for as long as we need to use. In other words, it would only be active during an administration session. Ideally, it wouldn't be a lot of work to setup and tear down either.

SSH to the rescue...

Fortunately, SSH client and server come with support for this out of the box, requiring no additional software to be installed, and no configuration changes. On the server side, sshd, the setting "AllowTcpForwarding" defaults to "yes" unless your sshd_config file explicitly disables it. On the client side, all you have to do is request the forwarding.
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mail this link | permapage | score:7571 | -Ray, May 6, 2004

Secure OpenVPN with one time passwords on Ubuntu

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So, you got yourself a nice OpenVPN box. People need to login with their certificates but... if their laptop is stolen anyone could login. Sure, you could add password login but that's a bit outdated. The solution for this is using an OTP (one time password). read more...
permapage | score:7529 | -falko, July 14, 2011

Set up OpenVPN Server, OpenLDAP on Debian 6.0

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OpenVPN, or Open Virtual Private Network, is a tool for creating networking "tunnels" between and among groups of computers that are not on the same local network. This is useful if you have services on a local network and need to access them remotely but don't want these services to be publicly accessible. By integrating with OpenSSL, OpenVPN can encrypt all VPN traffic to provide a secure connection between machines. read more...
permapage | score:7446 | -falko, March 28, 2011

Installing Adito/OpenVPN-ALS on CentOS

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OpenVPN-ALS, formerly known as Adito, is not to be confused with OpenVPN. They both brilliant tools that work in completely different things, but in a similar way. Confused? Excellent... OpenVPN-ALS (from now on known as Adito, because I find it less confusing) is a browser based SSL VPN that enables you to acess resources on your own network, even if you are behind a restrictive proxy and/or firewall. read more...
permapage | score:7398 | -falko, January 10, 2013

VPNs and IPSec Explained

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For my simple needs, SSH is fine. I feel so lucky that there is something out there that I don't have to deal with -- yet.
A VPN, or Virtual Private Network, is a cryptosystem that allows you to secure your data as it travels over an insecure network such as the Internet. While this may sound similar to the SSH cryptosystem, VPNs have a different purpose. SSH was designed to allow a user to login securely to and remotely administer another computer. A VPN is designed to allow a user to access transparently the resources of a network. As far as the user is concerned, she will be able to do anything she normally would be able to do, even when she is away from the network. Because of this, VPNs are popular with telecommuters and with offices that need to share resources over physically separate locations.
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mail this link | permapage | score:7149 | -Ray, December 17, 2002

Introduction to OpenVPN

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This .pdf introduction covers OpenVPN under Fedora and Red Hat -- as well as that other OS...
This document will introduce OpenVPN as a free, secure and easy to use and configure SSLbased VPN solution. The document will present some simple (and verified) scenario’s that might be useful for preparing security/networking labs with students, for creating a remote access solution or as a new project for the interested home user.
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permapage | score:7093 | -Ray, August 14, 2004

Set up a Router and OpenVPN Bridge with Lintrack

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This tutorial will guide you through the installation and configuration of Lintrack, a GNU/Linux distribution specialized in networking tasks. We will give two LANs access to the internet along with DHCP and DNS cache servers, and then we will connect our networks using OpenVPN in bridging mode. You should be running all these in well under an hour, thanks to the unified configuration interface of Lintrack. read more...
permapage | score:6949 | -falko, May 12, 2007

Book Review: Comparing, Designing, and Deploying VPNs

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Comparing, Designing, and Deploying VPNs lists for about $80.
The cover declares that it is a “practical guide” for comparing such things as IPsec, MPLS Layer 3, L2TP (versions 2 and 3), AtoM, and SSL virtual private networks. What makes it a practical guide is that almost every chapter begins with a Benefits and Drawbacks section for the technology being discussed and immediately lets you know whether you should consider this or not. I found this approach extremely helpful and appreciated having that information at the beginning of the chapter.
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mail this link | permapage | score:6877 | -Ray, June 5, 2006

Internet, LAN over OpenVPN: Linux server – Windows/Linux clients

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The aim of this tutorial is to enable you to set up a little VPN that will let you do many things – but my primary goal when trying to get this to work was to allow me and my friend (who sits behind a firewalled network at University) to play the new games that would not work over Hamachi because they did not ship with LAN and required an always-on internet connection (DRM). His network also uses traffic shaping and blocks UDP packets, making online gaming impossible. read more...
permapage | score:6831 | -falko, August 17, 2011

Tutorial: Bridge networks with OpenVPN

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Bridge networks with open source software...
For this setup I'll assume that you have two networks, A and B, in different locations, both connected to the Internet with broadband. At each location you will need a Linux system acting as a router/firewall to serve as the VPN end point. I'm using two Asus WL-500G Deluxe routers running OpenWRT RC5 -- a Linux distribution for embedded routers -- but you're free to use the hardware and distribution of your choice. You can use one of the BSDs, Mac OS X, or even Windows...
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mail this link | permapage | score:6692 | -Ray, November 23, 2006

Create secure wireless networks with OpenBSD and OpenVPN

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How to set up secure wireless access points...
For our VPN we could use OpenBSD's excellent implementation of IPsec (included in the base system), but we'll use OpenVPN instead because it can be deployed easily on both the server and a wide range of clients, including *BSD, Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X. OpenVPN scales well and is secure. The software is already included in OpenBSD's ports and packages repositories, so go ahead and install it.
read more...
permapage | score:6164 | -Ray, December 14, 2005
More articles...
Buy Large Wall Art Prints

Selected articles

MiniLesson: An introduction to Linux in ten commands

Space Tyrant: A multiplayer network game for Linux

Why software sucks

Space Tyrant: Multithreading lessons learned on SMP hardware

The Network Computer: An opportunity for Linux

Beneficial Computer Viruses

The life cycle of a programmer

Apple DIY Repair

No, RMS, Linux is not GNU/Linux

Scripting: A parallel Linux backup script

Hacker Haiku

Mono-culture and the .NETwork effect

The short life and hard times of a Linux virus

Space Tyrant: A threaded C game project: First Code

Closed Source Linux Distribution Launched

Apple to Intel move no threat to Linux

Graffiti Server Download Page

Linux dominates Windows

How to install Ubuntu Linux on the decTOP SFF computer

Programming Language Tradeoffs: 3GL vs 4GL

Why Programmers are not Software Engineers

Tutorial: Introduction to Linux files

Testing the Digital Ocean $5 Cloud Servers with an MMORPG

The Real Microsoft Monopoly

Librenix T-Shirts and Coffee Mugs!

Download: Linux 3D Client for Starship Traders

Space Tyrant: A threaded game server project in C

Linux vs. Windows: Why Linux will win

VPS: Xen vs. OpenVZ

The Supreme Court is wrong on Copyright Case

Microsoft to push unlicensed users to Linux

Missing the point of the Mac Mini

Shadow.sh: A simple directory shadowing script for Linux

 

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Articles are owned by their authors.   © 2000-2012 Ray Yeargin